Growing goals

Not everybody can be an Olympic athlete or a Nobel prize winner, but this young person argues that achievement is all relative.

girl against graffiti wall
But in reality, every person achieves ordinary miracles everyday, even me.
Sometimes I take a look at my life and think that I've done absolutely nothing. People I went to school with are doing all kinds of amazing things with their lives. Some are in long-term relationships and buying their first house, some are now assistant producers on television programs, competing in international sporting events, or even half way through doing medicine at Uni.

Me? I'm 20 years old, have two kids, and I spend most of my days whingeing about how little work there is around for singers and how my family relationships have fallen apart.

Doing it for me

But in reality, every person achieves ordinary miracles everyday, even me. The challenge is not only to see the bigger achievements as miracles, but the little ones too. I set baby-step goals for myself, things that mean I push myself but not over the limit. Every time I succeed, I try something a little bigger.

Like cooking, for example; I hate cooking for my family because everyone has different dietary needs. When I make a dinner that all of us can eat, I feel I have achieved something huge. That may not be as important as getting into university to some people, but it is a pretty big achievement to me.

At the end of the day I have to be proud of how I have succeeded in my life, I may not be capable of big things yet, but everyday I succeed in all kinds of challenges. I think it's important to measure your achievements against yourself and not people around you.

So all those people I went to school with can keep striving for their medicine degrees or Olympic medals, because I am achieving everyday ordinary miracles. Just because I won't have a medal or piece of paper for doing it - doesn't make it any less of an achievement.
Last reviewed: 13 August, 2015
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