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People who bully are looking to get under your skin, and they might even feel encouraged if they believe they’re getting to you. It's good to know you have a choice on how to deal with bullying in the heat of the moment.

In this interactive video, you can choose whether to stand up for yourself or not respond to bullying, and check out some useful advice for both options.

If you have a friend to support you, and standing up for yourself isn't likely to make the situation worse, it can be a good option. The main thing to remember is to stand strong, even if that means faking it until you make it, and find a way to let the person bullying you know that you don't like the way you're being treated.

The other option is to walk away. Keep your head up, and walk away without looking back. However you respond to bullying, don't forget to talk to someone you trust about what you've experienced and how you're dealing.

It's important to remember that while you have a choice in how you respond to bullying, it's not your fault if the bullying continues, and you shouldn't have to deal with bullying alone. Talk to a parent, guardian, or teacher if you're experiencing bullying and don't know how to cope.

One in four young people have experienced bullying in the last 12 months, so if you're experiencing bullying, you're not alone.

What can I do now?

  • Our number 1 tip is to talk to someone about what you're going through. Rahart Adams breaks down the 5 key steps for you here.
  • It can help to plan ahead, check out our tips here.
  • Remember you're not alone, and it will get better. That's what young people who had experienced bullying told us. Check out their other advice here.