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Sexting can be a fun way to flirt, but be aware that once an image is out of your hands it can go anywhere – and sometimes does! Imagine your sext partner showing your photo to his or her friends. Get the deets on what’s involved in sexting, and if it’s not for you, don’t feel pressured! There are many people out there who keep their sexy side off camera, and you can, too.

This can help if:

  • you’re not sure what sexting is
  • you’re being pressured to sext but are unsure about it
  • you want to understand the risks of sexting.
Back of girl holding phone

What does ‘sexting’ mean?

Sexting is when you willingly share sexual messages and/or sexual images of yourself with someone on your phone or online.

Is it legal?

In Australia, sexting is generally okay if it's between two consenting adults. If either person is under 18, though, it can mean big trouble. Naked or sexual images of people under 18 are considered child pornography, and there are serious legal consequences for distributing or possessing child porn. Check out Lawstuff for what can happen in your state, before you snap or send anything.

Don’t be pressured into sexting

It’s never okay for someone to force or guilt you into sharing photos of yourself that they can keep and share with others. Remember: if someone shares a sensitive photo of you without your consent, that’s cyberbullying. Before you dive head-first into sexting, figure out what you’re comfortable with and what gives you the heebie-jeebies. If it doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t a good idea.

Think before you sext

Once an image is taken, it can go anywhere, be sent to other people or even be posted online, which can be hurtful, humiliating and distressing. Be prepared for what might happen if the content gets into the wrong hands – and if in doubt, don’t send it in the first place!

What can I do now?

  • Make sure both the sender and the recipient consent.
  • Check out Lawstuff for what can happen in your state.
  • If you’re not comfortable with the risk, don’t take and share photos.